Archive for the ‘Others’ category

3 Ways to Remove Windows 10 Computer from Domain

February 27th, 2020 by Admin

How do I remove a computer from a domain that no longer exists? Or unjoin and rejoin the domain without resetting user profile? In this tutorial we’ll show you 3 methods to remove Windows 10 computer from domain. Before getting started, you need to log on to Windows 10 with local administrator account instead of domain account. If you couldn’t remember the password, PCUnlocker can be of help.

Method 1: Remove Windows 10 Computer from Domain Using System Properties

  1. Press the Windows key + R on the keyboard, then type sysdm.cpl in the Run box and press Enter.

  2. When the System Properties window opens, click on the Change button at the bottom of the “Computer Name” tab.

  3. Select the Workgroup radio button, enter a workgroup name you want to be a member of after unjoining the domain. Click OK.

  4. Click OK when prompted.

    You will be asked to restart the computer so that changes can be applied.

Method 2: Remove Windows 10 Computer from Domain Using Settings App

  1. Open the Settings app and navigate to Accounts -> Access work or school. On the right pane, click the icon labeled Connected to (your domain) AD domain, and then click Disconnect.

  2. Click on Yes to confirm.

  3. When the “Disconnect from the organization” prompt appears, click on Disconnect.

  4. Once restarted, you Windows 10 computer has been unjoined from active directory domain.

Method 3: Remove Windows 10 Computer from Domain Using PowerShell

  1. Open the Windows PowerShell with admin rights, type the following command to unjoin the domain.
    Remove-Computer -UnjoinDomaincredential Domain_Name\Administrator -PassThru -Verbose -Restart -Force

    Enter the domain administrator password when prompted, and click OK.

  2. You’ll see a warning: After you leave the domain you will need to know the password of the local administrator account to log onto this computer. Type Y to continue.

  3. Restart your computer to complete this unjoin operation.

3 Ways to Add Windows 10 to Active Directory Domain

February 21st, 2020 by Admin

How can I join a Windows 10 Pro computer to a domain? Before getting started, you need to change the DNS settings or add a new entry to the Windows Hosts file so your PC can communication with domain controller. Afterwards, you can add Windows 10 to Active Directory domain using any of the following methods. Note that only Windows 10 Pro, Enterprise or Education edition can join a domain.

Method 1: Add Windows 10 to Domain from System Properties

  1. Press the Windows key + R to open the Run command box. Type sysdm.cpl and hit Enter to launch System Properties.

  2. Under the Computer Name tab, click on the Change… button.

  3. Select Domain, type the domain name of the AD server you want to join and click OK.

  4. Type the credentials of a domain user and click OK.

  5. Finally restart your computer and you can then sign in to Windows 10 with your domain account.

Method 2: Add Windows 10 to Domain from Settings App

  1. Press the Windows key + I to open the Settings app. Navigate to Accounts -> Access work or school, and then click Connect on the right side.

  2. In the popup window, click on the “Join this device to a local Active Directory domain” option.

  3. Type the Active Directory domain name and click Next.

  4. Enter the user name and password for your domain account, and click OK.

  5. Select your Account type to continue. You’ll need to restart to complete the process of joining Windows 10 to Active Directory domain.

Method 3: Add Windows 10 to Domain Using PowerShell

  1. Open PowerShell with administrator rights and type the following command:
    Add-Computer -DomainName "Domain Name" -Credential "Domain Username"

  2. Once pressing Enter, you will be prompted to enter your domain user password.

  3. A warning will be displayed in yellow like the one below. You need to reboot to finish the task.

That’s it!

2 Ways to Turn on / off Clipboard Sync on Windows 10

February 16th, 2020 by Admin

Starting with Windows 10 October 2018, the new clipboard can sync text/image that you copy across devices through the cloud. Whenever you copy some text, the clipboard sends it to Microsoft’s cloud for synchronization, so you can access it from another computer that you are signed in to with the same Microsoft account. By default, Clipboard sync is turned off. In this tutorial we’ll show you 2 methods to enable or disable the clipboard sync feature on Windows 10.

Method 1: Turn on / off Clipboard Sync Using Settings App

  1. Press Windows + I keyboard shortcut to open Settings, and then click on System.

  2. Choose Clipboard from the left pane. On the right, turn on the toggle button under Sync across devices to enable clipboard sync.

    To prevent syncing potentially sensitive data, you’d better turn this feature off.

  3. Once you’ve completed the steps, Windows 10 will know whether or not to sync clipboard history depending upon your settings.

Method 2: Turn on / off Clipboard Sync Using Registry Editor

  1. Open Registry Editor and navigate to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\System. On the right pane, right-click on the blank area and select New -> DWORD (32-bit) Value.

  2. Name the value AllowCrossDeviceClipboard. Double-click it and set the value to 1 for turning on the clipboard sync feature.

    If you need to disable clipboard sync, just change its value to 0.

  3. Close the Registry Editor. The changes will take effect immediately.

Conclusion

If you’re using Windows 10 Professional or Enterprise, you can also turn off clipboard sync using group policy. Just open Local Group Policy Editor and browse to: Computer Configuration > Administrative Templates > System > OS Policies, set the “Allow Synchronization across Devices” policy to disabled. This will prevent users from turning on clipboard sync using the Settings app.

How to Show Windows 10 Version and Build Number on the Desktop

February 4th, 2020 by Admin

There are various ways to determine the build number of Windows 10 running on your computer, but none of them are more straightforward than displaying Windows 10 build information as watermark on the desktop. In this tutorial we’ll show you a hidden registry trick which can make Windows 10 show the edition and build number at the bottom right of your desktop.

How to Show Windows 10 Version and Build Number on the Desktop

Press the Windows key + R together to open the Run command, type regedit and hit Enter.

Once the Registry Editor is open, navigate to: HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Control Panel\Desktop. Double-click on the DWORD value PaintDesktopVersion in the right-hand pane.

Change the default value from 0 to 1 and click OK. Log off or restart your computer. After that, you will see the Windows version and build number being displayed at the bottom right of the screen just above the system tray.

That’s it!

Turn off Hardware Acceleration in Chrome or Microsoft Edge

January 26th, 2020 by Admin

How do I disable hardware rendering in Edge? Chrome won’t load or play videos in the webpage, no sound upon playing? To resolve these problems, you can try to disable hardware acceleration. In this tutorial we’ll show you how to turn off hardware acceleration for the most popular web browsers – Chrome and Microsoft Edge.

Part 1: Disable Hardware Acceleration in Chrome

Open your Chrome browser and type “chrome://settings/system” in the address bar, hit Enter.

Uncheck the box of “Use hardware acceleration when available“. Click on the Relaunch button appeared just now to apply the change.

Part 2: Disable Hardware Acceleration in Microsoft Edge

The new Microsoft Edge is built on the same Chromium platform as Chrome, so you can use the similar method to disable hardware acceleration in Microsoft Edge Chromium:

Open Microsoft Edge and type “edge://settings/system” in the address bar, hit Enter.

Turn off the toggle switch for “Use hardware acceleration when available“. Click on the Restart button to relaunch Microsoft Edge.

That’s it!

How to Show Different Time Zone Clocks on Windows 10 Taskbar

January 17th, 2020 by Admin

By default, Windows 10 will display a single clock with your local time in the system tray. If you want an additional clock, here is an easy way to make Windows 10 show different time zone clocks on the taskbar. This is really useful when you need to know if it’s a good time to call a friend or a colleague who lives in different time zones.

How to Show Different Time Zone Clocks on Windows 10 Taskbar

  1. Press the Windows key + I to open the Settings app, then click on Time & Language.

  2. Select the Date & time tab. Scroll down to the “Related settings” section and click on “Add clocks for different time zones“.

  3. Under the “Additional Clocks” tab, check the “Show this clock” box, choose the time zone you want and give it a name. Note that you can add up to two additional time zone clocks.

  4. After you’re done, click OK. Now move your cursor over the clock at the bottom right corner of the taskbar, and you will see two additional time zone clocks appearing right under the local time.

That’s it!

How to Check if a Process is Running as Administrator in Windows 10

January 15th, 2020 by Admin

When you try to run an program with admin privileges, a UAC prompt will ask for permission to continue. But there are some scheduled tasks or background applications which can run as admin without the UAC prompt. In this tutorial we’ll show you a simple method to check if a process is running as administrator in Windows 10.

How to Check if a Process is Running as Administrator in Windows 10

  1. Press the Windows key + R to open the Run box, type taskmgr and then hit Enter to launch Task Manager.

  2. Go to the Details tab. Right-click any column header and choose “Select Columns” from the popup menu.

  3. Scroll down until you see the Elevated option, check that box and click OK.

  4. Now, the Details tab of Task Manager will be showing a new “Elevated” column. You can easily see which process is launched with admin/elevated privileges.

That’s it!

2 Ways to Disable / Block Microsoft Edge Extensions in Windows 10

January 8th, 2020 by Admin

Browser extensions are third-party add-ons that provide extra functionality to Microsoft Edge. When your browser slows down or it doesn’t load webpage properly, a problematic extension may be the major cause. In this tutorial we’ll show you how to disable extension support and prevent users from installing any extension in Microsoft Edge on Windows 10.

Method 1: Disable Extensions in Microsoft Edge Using GPO

  1. Press the Windows Key + R together, type in gpedit.msc and hit Enter to open Local Group Policy Editor.

  2. Navigate to: Computer Configuration -> Administrative Templates -> Windows Components -> Microsoft Edge. In the right pane you will see the Allow Extensions policy. Double-click on it to modify.

  3. Select the Disabled option and click OK.

  4. After restarting your computer, you can no longer install extensions in the Edge browser, and the extensions that are already installed will also be disabled automatically. If you open the Settings menu in the Edge browser, you will see that the “Extensions” option is greyed out.

Method 2: Disable Extensions in Microsoft Edge Using Registry Editor

  1. Press the Windows Key + R together, type in regedit and hit Enter to open Registry Editor.

  2. In the left pane of Registry Editor, navigate to: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft. Right-click on the “Microsoft” key to create a new key named MicrosoftEdge. Next, right-click on the newly created key and create a new key named Extensions.

  3. Right-click on any blank area in the right pane to create a DWORD (32-bit) Value named ExtensionsEnabled, and make sure the value data is set to 0.

  4. Close Registry Editor and restart Windows, you won’t be able to use or install any extension on Microsoft Edge. Whenever you need to enable extension support again, simply delete the DWORD ExtensionsEnabled and you’re done.

How to Create System Restore Points with Command Prompt or PowerShell

January 6th, 2020 by Admin

By default, Windows will automatically create a restore point before you make a major change to the OS, such as installing a new driver or app. In order to make more frequent backup, you need to create restore points manually or schedule the task to run daily or weekly. In this tutorial we’ll show you how to create system restore points in Windows 10 using Command Prompt or PowerShell.

Part 1: Turn On System Protection

Before getting started, you need to check if system protection is enabled. Press the Windows key + R to open the Run box and type “sysdm.cpl” to open the System Properties window.

Go to the System Protection tab and click on the Configure button.

Select “Turn on system protection” and click OK.

Part 2: Disable System Restore Point Frequency

By default, Windows allows you to create only one restore point every 24 hours. To remove this limitation, open Registry Editor and navigate to: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\SystemRestore. Right-click on the SystemRestore key in the left pane and select New ->DWORD (32-bit) Value.

Give the new DWORD a name SystemRestorePointCreationFrequency and leave its value data to 0.

Part 3: Create System Restore Point with CMD or PowerShell

Open an elevated Command Prompt and type the following command:
wmic.exe /Namespace:\\root\default Path SystemRestore Call CreateRestorePoint "MyRestorePoint", 100, 7

or launch Windows PowerShell as administrator and enter:
powershell.exe -ExecutionPolicy Bypass -NoExit -Command "Checkpoint-Computer -Description "MyRestorePoint" -RestorePointType "MODIFY_SETTINGS""

Once pressing Enter, a new system restore point will be created immediately. You can use Task Scheduler to make your system run the above command to create restore points automatically during startup.

3 Ways to Disable Clipboard History in Windows 10

January 3rd, 2020 by Admin

Is there a way to turn off the clipboard history feature? Starting with Windows 10 October 2018 Update, the clipboard can save multiple items (text and images) that were copied and sync them across devices. This may inevitably cause your sensitive data appear in the clipboard history. In this tutorial we’ll show you 3 easy ways to disable clipboard history in Windows 10.

Method 1: Disable Clipboard History in Settings App

Open the Settings app and click on the System category. Under the Clipboard tab, toggle the “Clipboard history” option to Off. This should disable clipboard history immediately.

Method 2: Disable Clipboard History Using Group Policy

Open the Local Group Policy Editor and browse to: Computer Configuration -> Administrative Templates -> System -> OS Policies. On the right pane, double-click on “Allow Clipboard History“.

Set the policy to Disabled. Click OK and reboot your computer. This will turn off clipboard history for all users on your system.

Method 3: Disable Clipboard History Using Registry Editor

Open Registry Editor and navigate to: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\System. Right-click on the right pane and select New -> DWORD (32-bit Value).

Name the newly created DWORD as AllowClipboardHistory. Give it a value of 0 and reboot.

When you try to turn on the clipboard history option in Settings app, you’ll find it is grayed out. Whenever you need to enable clipboard history, just navigate to the same registry location and delete the AllowClipboardHistory entry.

That’s it!